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Official Blog of the Chilliwack Museum and Archives

Archive for the ‘Engagement’ Category

New Curator’s work enriched by Fine Arts Background & Diverse Exhibitions Experience

Posted on: May 3rd, 2017 by

Recently our Executive Director, Matthew Francis, had the opportunity to catch up with Adrienne Rempel, who was recently hired to serve as Curator in a one-year temporary role, during our Curator Jane Lemke’s maternity leave. Here’s an opportunity to get to know more about Adrienne. 

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Hi Adrienne! You have been on the job as Curator here now for almost a month. How have you found your first few weeks?

Curator Adrienne Rempel in the Old Library of Trinity College Dublin—home to the Book of Kells.

Curator Adrienne Rempel in the Old Library of Trinity College Dublin—home to the Book of Kells.

 I have thoroughly enjoyed my first few weeks at the Museum and Archives. The staff and volunteers are incredibly committed and enthusiastic, and they possess a vast knowledge of local history. I am getting to know the Collection and its strengths, and am happily digging into the next round of exhibition programming.

 Before taking on this role, you had recently moved to Chilliwack from Vancouver. What are some of the things that attracted you to live in Chilliwack, and how have you found living in the community?

 Before I settled on Chilliwack, I left Vancouver for a five month backpacking trip in Europe. During this time, I found that while I enjoyed visiting large urban centres, I always felt more relaxed and comfortable in smaller communities. By the time I was nearing my return flight to Vancouver, I knew it was time for a change.

Curator Adrienne Rempel, in Barbarino Val d’Elsa in Tuscany (established in the 13th century and still boasting architecture from the 14th century!)

Curator Adrienne Rempel, in Barbarino Val d’Elsa in Tuscany (established in the 13th century and still boasting architecture from the 14th century!)

I was attracted to Chilliwack for its natural beauty and closeness to nature. It’s also close enough to the amenities of the Lower Mainland, without being in the centre of it. It doesn’t hurt that it came highly recommended by my partner who grew up here.

Immediately after moving to Chilliwack, I felt welcome in the community. People here take an active interest in each other, and are very supportive and friendly. I’ve also noticed there is a healthy amount of interest and growth in the Arts & Culture sector, which makes Chilliwack an exciting place to be!

 Can you share with us a little about your academic and professional background? What did you do before you started with us?

My background is in the Fine Arts. I have a degree from Emily Carr University of Art + Design where I studied painting and studio arts, and after graduation I participated in numerous group exhibitions in the lower mainland. During this time I also worked and volunteered with various cultural organizations in Vancouver. I’ve always been drawn to the cultural, not-for-profit sector, as it offers so many opportunities for community engagement and arts advocacy. In the last handful of years, I found myself working in the Curatorial Department of the Vancouver Art Gallery, where I assisted in the planning and production of exhibitions and publications.

 You have rich experience in the visual arts, and were involved in planning numerous exhibits each year for the Vancouver Art Gallery. What interested you in working in a Museum context with a focus on history? How do history and the arts relate?

 As much as I love the unquantifiable aspects of art, I am also a huge art history and cultural theory nerd. There’s a saying in the arts, “You can’t make art in a bubble.” What this means is that everyone is influenced to some degree by the context of their time, be it political, social, economic, etc. In art history, we learn that Jackson Pollock, for instance, became an influential figure in the abstract expressionist movement not only because of his unique drip paintings, but because of the particular socio-political conditions of Cold War America. To learn about art, you have to learn history as well. The two are very connected.

To take that idea into the museum context… I can accept that on a certain level, an art object is another form of material culture. One can look at any human-made object, from the first Fender Stratocaster, to an Etruscan vase, to a handmade roadsign, and start to wonder, “Why was this made?” Searching for that answer can be endlessly fascinating. I am a curious person, and the museum experience is a great way to learn about our world.

What are some of the things you are looking forward to in your work at the Chilliwack Museum and Archives this year?

 I am really excited for the upcoming exhibition program. This summer the CMA will launch an exhibition, Gold Mountain Dream, that explores the history of the first Chinese immigrants in British Columbia. This presentation will be in partnership with the Royal British Columbia Museum in Victoria, and will include some very important locally developed content.

As I am new to the community, it has been a positive experience to dive into the region’s history. In the coming months, I look forward to developing my understanding of Chilliwack, and building connections in the community.

Thank you, Adrienne, for taking the time to talk with us. We are looking forward to a great year ahead! 

Adrienne Rempel, Curator, can be reached at (604) 795-5210 ext. 105 or by email at [email protected].

Chilliwack Museum and Historical Society Celebrates 60 Years!

Posted on: April 24th, 2017 by
Come celebrate with us! 60th Birthday Party - Saturday May 13th @ 1pm. Everyone's invited!

Come celebrate with us! The Chilliwack Museum and Archives’ 60th Birthday Party – Saturday May 13th @ 10am. Everyone’s invited!

Sixty years ago, in the Spring of 1957, a committed group of Chilliwack citizens gathered together at the Chilliwack Senior High School for the first official meeting of the Chilliwack Historical Society. They carried forward a dream which many people had shared since the early years of the 20th century – to establish a Museum to connect people to Chilliwack’s history. Through their hard work and determination, this object was soon realized with the opening of the Chilliwack Museum the following March.

The Minutes of the first General Meeting of the Historical Society, April 10, 1957.

The Minutes of the first General Meeting of the Historical Society, April 10, 1957.

This year – as Canada celebrates 150 years – the Chilliwack Museum and Historical Society is commemorating our own “Diamond Jubilee,” sixty years of connecting our community to the memories, moments, and people, and material culture that mean so much to us.

Throughout this 60th Anniversary year, we will be sharing the stories of the Museum’s founders, as well as many others over the years who have shaped the Museum and Archives. This includes such leaders as Oliver N. Wells and Chief Richard Malloway, as well as many others.

Together, they all form our collective story – one that is still being written and lived out today.

You are invited to be a part of this Chilliwack story! Come and join us Saturday May 13th at 10am, for a good old-fashioned community Birthday Party for the Chilliwack Museum and Archives!

  • Free Museum Admission for the Day
  • Festive treats and prizes 
  • Hear informative updates on the work of the Museum and Archives 
  • Become a member of the Chilliwack Museum and Historical Society. 

All are warmly welcome.

For more information contact Matthew Francis, Executive Director, Chilliwack Museum and Archives at [email protected] or (604) 795-5210 ext. 101. 

Looking Together – Visiting the Museum with a Multigenerational Group

Posted on: April 5th, 2017 by

Over the two weeks of Spring Break this year we welcomed all kinds of multi-generational groups to our museum and had a great time sharing with first-time visitors and long-time members what we have to offer our community. Groups came in all different shapes and sizes, from children visiting with their grandparents to caregivers with children aging from babies to teens.

Updated Discovery Hunts are available daily for all ages.

Updated Discovery Hunts are available daily for all ages.

Whereas some embrace visiting museums with a multi-generational group, it can sometimes be difficult keeping the youngest in your group engaged at the same time as the older ones. So how do we ‘Look Together’ when visiting a museum so that the trip is a fun, meaningful and engaging experience for everyone? For this blog post, I thought I’d share a few tips and tricks that you can use on your next trip to the museum!

Prepping for your visit – Before:

  • Find out your groups prior knowledge of the museum. Does someone in your group have a favourite memory of a previous visit? Have them share this memory with the rest of the group.
  • For first time visitors ask questions like: What is a museum? What can we see and do at the museum? Why do we have museums? Make connections with life at home – is there a place where you keep special objects from your past? Why are they important to you?
  • Come prepared: bring cameras, notebooks, pencils, and magnifying glasses to help you explore the exhibits and record your memories!

During your visit:

  • Talk to staff: Check in with the staff at the front desk to find out if there are any special activities to take part in. At the Chilliwack Museum we always have Discovery Hunts geared to two different age ranges, as well as our hands-on Discovery Bins available daily. These are fun for kids and adults!
  • Make comparisons: compare what you see in the exhibits to present day life in Chilliwack, what is the same and what is different? Does anyone in your group have memories they can share of a different time in Chilliwack’s history?
  • Play some Games! Ask someone in your group to tell a story about an object in an exhibit; Play I Spy to encourage everyone to look a little closer at what they see; Try ‘Tell me How or Why’ find an object and see if you can find out how it was made or why it was made.
  • Don’t forget to explore the site! Look closely at the architecture of the building, what is the same or different about buildings today?

After the visit:

  • Talk about your visit – What was your favourite part? If you were to share one thing about the museum with someone else what would it be?
  • Is there anything you are still wondering about? Pursue topics that interest your group further by looking online (our online collections can be accessed here) or by visiting the archives.
  • Give us your feedback as to what you’d like to see or do at the museum in the future!
  • Follow us on social media to keep up with our events and activities or check the Events Calendar.
  • Use your museum experience to create your own museum exhibit at home. Start a collection of favourite objects at home and put them together into an exhibit to share with friends and family!

I hope this gives you some inspiration for your next visit to the museum. We’re looking forward to welcoming groups of all ages to the museum as we gear up for our summer programming!

Interview with Merlin Bunt: Great-Great Grandson of Isaac Kipp Explores Chilliwack’s History

Posted on: March 27th, 2017 by

Recently Matthew Francis, Executive Director of the Chilliwack Museum and Archives, had the opportunity to sit down for a conversation with Merlin Bunt. Merlin is a proud member of the Chilliwack Museum and Historical Society, and was elected to serve on our Board of Directors last year. He is also the researcher and writer behind the popular “Chilliwack History Perspectives” Facebook page. In this interview, Merlin shares about his own keen interest in Chilliwack’s history, his personal connection to Chilliwack, and why history matters. 

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Merlin – can you describe some of your own personal background and your connection to Chilliwack?

Merlin Bunt, Member of the Board of Directors, Chilliwack Museum and Historical Society

Merlin Bunt, Member of the Board of Directors, Chilliwack Museum and Historical Society

I am a fifth-generation Chilliwackian, born here in the early 1950s, and my great-great-grandfather is Isaac Kipp, often referred to as the ‘father’ of Chilliwack. I have fond memories of being raised in Chilliwack.

Isaac Kipp Farmhouse. Chilliwack Musuem and Archives Photograph, P720.

Isaac Kipp Farmhouse. Chilliwack Museum and Archives Photograph, P720.

Since I spent my first 23 years here, in an era quite different from today, I greatly care about its past, present, and future. I have three daughters, each one a lawyer.  When I am not working, my hobbies include lawn bowling, hiking, cycling, and chronicling Chilliwack’s history.

People would be interested to know about your professional background. What can you tell us about that?

After graduating from CSSS in 1971, I attended UBC and graduated with a B. Com. degree in 1976. Later, I became a Chartered Professional Accountant.  Today I work for myself, providing financial consulting and editing/writing services for my clients.

You have an active interest in “connecting people to Chilliwack’s history,” researching and writing about locally significant historic places and events. Can you tell us a little about your popular Chilliwack History Perspectives Facebook page?

As I mentioned, my ancestors were integrally involved in the development of early Chilliwack.  My grandmother, Irene Bunt (nee Knight, born in Popkum in 1891 and passed away in Chilliwack in 1988) had a real passion for Chilliwack’s history (as she was witness to a good portion of it), she attempted to spark my interest in it.  Her grandfather was Isaac Kipp, and she would often tell me about him and early Chilliwack.  However, I was then living in Vancouver, with three children and a busy career, and my interest in Chilliwack’s history did not match hers, to say the least.  However, in recent years, as the nature of Chilliwack evolved, and certain physical  elements of its history were no longer with us, along with finding myself with more time, my interest in Chilliwack’s history became much more focused.  I finally joined Facebook in 2013, and as I enjoy writing, I found that I wanted to put ‘on the record’ certain aspects of Chilliwack’s  history, including the perspectives of my ancestors and me.  I started posting some informal accounts of Chilliwack history, and initial response was very positive, and thus in 2014 I created a Facebook Page dedicated to Chilliwack history called “Chilliwack History Perspectives”.  As time allows, I try to post a new article every two weeks, on Sunday mornings. To date, I have posted over 80 articles on Chilliwack’s history on this Page.

You  were elected to serve on the Board of Directors of the Museum last year, and we have really appreciated your participation and insights. What have you enjoyed about this experience so far?

Annual General Meeting of the Chilliwack Museum and Historical Society

Annual General Meeting of the Chilliwack Museum and Historical Society

I do quite enjoy being a member of the Museum’s Board of Directors, largely because everyone in the room has some connection to the history of Chilliwack, and a common commitment and passion to preserve it, enhance it, and share it with the area’s citizens.  It is also gratifying to have input to the stewardship of Chilliwack’s history, through both the Museum and the Archives, such that future generations can benefit and learn from our efforts now.  Beyond that, everyone associated with the Board and the Museum is very nice!

What do you enjoy doing for fun or recreation in Chilliwack?

I have recently become an avid lawn bowler, and I am on the Chilliwack Lawn Bowling Club’s Board of Directors. I also like going for early-morning bike rides (preferably when it is sunny) in which I ride past many historic Chilliwack locations, as well as places of personal memories for me.  During these rides, I have my smartphone with me, and occasionally if I see a worthy scene, I will stop and photograph it.  I will often stop just to visualize how something was, as opposed to how it is. Also, this coming summer, a group of us Chilliwack natives (and fans) are planning to climb Mt. Cheam.

Why should people explore Chilliwack’s history?

Chilliwack has a rich and significant history, and being a growing city approaching 90,000 citizens, knowing its roots and foundations gives an appreciation of how  it was, thus allowing us to understand where we are today, to perhaps better deal with what lies ahead tomorrow.  Also, sometimes it’s just fun to ‘escape’ to yesteryear, when times were simpler.

Thanks, Merlin, for taking the time to talk with us! 

Looking Forward to 2017

Posted on: December 20th, 2016 by

This past year has been jam packed with Education and Engagement projects. We’ve taken the museum out to events like Canada Day and Party in the Park and updated our hands-on Discovery Bins for children. We’ve been working with School District 33 to create local history kits and completed our first kit on Chilliwack’s Chinatowns. We’ve also updated our school programs to fit with the new BC Curriculum and hosted a number of speakers and events in the museum.

So what’s in store for 2017?

We’re working on developing a new Archives based program for Middle and High School students. This program will focus on introducing students to the archives and how to access and interpret primary sources.

Continuing to work on local history kits with the school district, we are currently focusing on developing resources on the floods of both 1894 and 1948 in the Fraser Valley.

This past fall we’ve been working with a group of Grade 6 students on an education project based on our current exhibit Photography from Obscura to App. Starting on February 9th we will be exhibiting students’ photographs at the museum. These will be on display until June 11th when Photography from Obscura to App closes.

As the host organization for the BC Historical Federation conference in May we are helping to plan a series of interesting workshops, field trips and lectures that will highlight our city and its diverse history.

As the year progresses we’ll be looking to continue scheduling events and activities for all ages. Don’t forget to check our Events Calendar or follow us on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram to find out what’s happening at the museum!

See you in 2017!

Introducing our first Local History Kit – Chilliwack’s Chinatowns!

Posted on: November 17th, 2016 by

I have been working on developing local history resources with an amazing team of SD33 teachers this past year. I am excited to announce that our first kit on Chilliwack’s Chinatowns is now ready for teachers and educators to book!

The Local History Kits came about through collaboration between the Chilliwack Museum and Archives and the Chilliwack School District. When reviewing the redesigned curriculum, the focus on local content and place-based learning created the perfect opportunity to use the resources that already exist at our museum and archives, and get them in the hands of students!

Chilliwack's Chinatowns Kit

The Chilliwack’s Chinatowns Kit comes with primary source reproductions, posters and a teacher guidebook.

The partnership involved a team of teachers across different grades to tap into the resources and connect them in a meaningful way to the new curriculum. The kit includes lessons and activities that are designed to address Big Ideas, Curricular Competencies and Content in a variety of subjects and grades. The aim is that when teachers use this kit in their classroom, students will be developing critical thinking skills while using meaningful, relevant, local materials.

Kits come with primary source reproductions relating to each specific topic, background information, timelines and supplementary materials needed to teach each lesson. They are now available to book here for $15/week or, if you are a SD33 teacher, you can contact the school district office to book the SD33 copy.

We are looking forward to receiving feedback from teachers to help us improve these kits and make them as student and teacher friendly as possible!

Having completed the kit on Chilliwack’s Chinatowns, we are now working on gathering resources on Flooding in Chilliwack, focusing on the 1894 and 1948 floods. As well, we are developing a kit for Grade 7 classes on key developments in our local community. Stay tuned to find out when these kits will be available!

Have questions about the kits or would like to book? You can contact me directly at [email protected]

Summer at the Museum

Posted on: August 17th, 2016 by

By Kelsey Ablitt, Education and Engagement Assistant, Summer 2016

Its almost difficult to grasp that my time at the museum is coming to an end in just two short weeks. These past few months have been filled with new experiences and a lot of learning. I learned about the work that goes into running a museum, how to research at the archives, what education at a museum looks like, that elastic bands can be kept in the fridge and the best way to get a dew worm to move in a race.

 

Busy at Party in the Park, the theme was Community of Villages this week.

Busy at Party in the Park, the theme was Community of Villages this week.

One of my biggest projects this summer was to revamp the Discovery Bins. These bins were designed to be themed and filled with interactive things for children to play with. Initially, I didn’t think that sprucing up these bins would take nearly as much time or work as they ended up taking. As I took a look at the different material in them, I found myself coming up with new themes to organize them into, different artifacts to add to them and new interactive worksheets to make for them. This was easily my biggest and most time consuming task of the summer, however I can’t help but feel accomplished when I see kids enjoying the history and artifacts that the bins provide. Redoing these bins taught me about how things that may seem simple, actually had a lot of hard work put into them. Not only did I have to make sure my facts were correct and my themes relevant, I also had to constantly consider if they were kid friendly and that means being accessible to a wide age group. This means including things that toddlers or children just learning to read can interact with as well as something a bit more in-depth that will interest older children.

 

Another important aspect of my position this summer was helping with the different outreach events. Our main outreach event was Party in the Park, every Friday night in July. My job was to plan a craft for kids to do when they stopped by our booth. I desired to make the crafts relevant to the history of Chilliwack as much as I could. To do so, I chose a different theme from Chilliwack’s history to focus on for each Friday. To help share the historical love even more, I created a poster full of images and facts on the themes. I found these posters to be quite useful when kids were busy doing the crafts, as it gave parents something to read. If there’s one thing I’ve learned from outreach, its that your crafts need to be interesting but quick. There are usually lots to see and do at events like Party in the Park, therefore not only do the kids have a shorter attention span, their parent also does not want to be at the same booth for a long period of time.

 

Pretty in Pink, the things you find in a museum!

Pretty in Pink, the things you find in a museum!

In between the major tasks of this summer, my time was filled with many other little projects. I was able to sit in on meetings, give my input on the various goings on in the museum, help with school programs and much more. There was never a dull moment, I was always learning something new about the history of Chilliwack or what it takes to get a printer to print what you want (and in a timely fashion). Despite how thankful I am for all the things I have learned and the level of accomplishment I felt when finishing projects, my favourite part of the whole summer was the new friendships I have gained. The museum is filled with so many colourful and caring people, from the staff to the volunteers. I have loved getting to know the volunteers and seeing their interest in Chilliwack’s history. I have loved being able to get to know the staff and learn of the amazing things they have accomplished and all the exciting ideas they have for the museum, they are all extremely inspiring people. However, I cannot help being extremely thankful for Stephanie, she taught me something new nearly everyday and constantly encouraged me. She gave me freedom with creativity, she was extremely patient with me and was always there to give helpful input. The experience that Stephanie and the museum has provided me is something I will always be grateful for and I cannot wait to put what I have learned to use in the future.

To ‘do’ History

Posted on: July 19th, 2016 by

This past week I attended the Historical Thinking Summer Institute at the Museum of Vancouver. The course is intended for both museum professionals and teachers to explore The Big Six: Historical Thinking Concepts by Peter Seixas and Tom Morton. The book encompasses a shift in the way that museums and educators look at teaching and learning about history. In place of learning ‘the facts’ of history through textbook rote learning, students are being asked to ‘do’ history. This means actually acting as the historians themselves and constructing their understanding of history through the historical thinking concepts.

 
What are the Big Six?

Seeing historical thinking in action at the Gulf of Georgia Cannery in Steveston.

Seeing historical thinking in action at the Gulf of Georgia Cannery in Steveston.

Each of the concepts look at different aspects of constructing an history. They are Historical Significance, Evidence, Continuity and Change, Cause and Consequence, Historical Perspective and the Ethical Dimension.

 
Each concept has separate guideposts which illustrate how to work with them and also offer potential teaching strategies when approaching them with learners. All of the concepts work together to help learners begin to think like an historian. The interpretation of both primary and secondary sources (Evidence) is central to all of the concepts.

 
What does this have to do with museums?

 
Although historians and curators may use the historical thinking concepts, the process and skills that are used to put histories, exhibits together have not always been transparent. By sharing this process and helping to teach others to ‘do’ history themselves, museums and archives can open their collections to further understandings and interesting collaborations with the communities they work with.

 
Embracing the historical thinking concepts

 
This past week was filled with inspiring conversations with both museum professionals and teachers alike. The potential (and need!) for collaborations amongst teachers, museums, universities and so on stood out. We have a common interest and passion for history education and there are many ways we can better work together.

Using low-tech and hi-tech teaching strategies for an exhibit based historical thinking game!

Using low-tech and hi-tech teaching strategies for an exhibit based historical thinking game!

As part of our course, we were asked to work in groups, to come up with ideas on how to encourage and incorporate the historical thinking concepts into our practice, whether in the classroom, for a museum program or as an exhibit. Our group took a game-based approach and came up with an exhibit based game which had students thinking critically about primary sources, historical significance and perspectives.

 
There are so many great ideas and ways to bring historical thinking into museums. Leaving this course left me feeling inspired and enthusiastic to bring these ideas into my work here.

 
You can check out some of the photos and thoughts shared at this year’s institute with #HTSI2016.

Free Museum and Archives Memberships for Newcomers to Chilliwack!

Posted on: July 4th, 2016 by

Our vision here at the Chilliwack Museum and Archives is to “connect people with Chilliwack’s history.” We do this in many ways – through exhibits, publications, programs for students and the public, interaction online, and through various media. Now, the Chilliwack Museum and Archives are opening our doors wide, offering one-year memberships free of charge to all those who have made Chilliwack their home over the past twelve months.

kids at museum 13 DSC_0473

We know that many people are moving to Chilliwack and making this community their home. Sometimes when you arrive in a new place, it takes some time to get your bearings and feel “settled.” Many folks are relocating because Chilliwack is more affordable than greater Vancouver, and Chilliwack has great schools, abundant recreation, and friendly people. Some courageous people have made a new life here in Canada after having to leave everything behind in their homelands due to war and uncertainty.

Wherever you have come from – Sicamous or Sierra Leone, Surrey or Syria – you are welcome here! The Chilliwack Museum and Archives are yours to discover. Approximately 1400 newcomers made Chilliwack home last year, and that trend is likely to continue. We would like the Museum and Archives to be a place of connection where people can learn about the city – with its diverse stories, people, and experiences. Chilliwack is a community of villages – with each distinct area having its own unique character. From Rosedale to Yarrow and each neighbourhood in between, Chilliwack has a rich history that is worth exploring. You can do that here at the Museum and Archives.

Providing a membership opens an opportunity for people new to Chilliwack to take in our current exhibit Game On! The Evolution of Sports in Chilliwack or to experience our upcoming exhibit, opening in September – Photography: From Obscura to App.

All those who have settled in Chilliwack within the past twelve months are invited to come into the Museum, located in the historic Chilliwack City Hall National Historic Site (45820 Spadina Avenue), to claim their complimentary one-year membership. Alternatively, newcomers to the city can also sign up online at: http://www.chilliwackmuseum.ca/join-support/membership/, using the promotional code “chwk1957.” Membership gets you free admission to the Museum, as well as discounts on select products and services.

Membership Card-1

For more information, please feel free to contact me, Matthew Francis, any time at (604) 795-5210, or better yet – come by the Museum and say hello. 

Summer Outreach and Events

Posted on: June 16th, 2016 by

Myself and our summer student, Kelsey, have been working hard to get ready for summer here at the museum and out in the community. We’re looking forward to taking part in Canada Day celebrations as well as Party in the Park with the Downtown Chilliwack BIA.

Kelsey poses with one of our new Discovery Bins. Come visit to find out what's inside!

Kelsey poses with one of our new Discovery Bins. Come visit to find out what’s inside!

Getting out into the community and taking part in events is important to us as we seek to share our community’s history! This year we’re focusing on bringing fun hands-on activities to these events that will help tell the story of our past for both young and old alike.

 
Each Party in the Park night we’ll be focusing on a different topic that relates to Chilliwack’s history. Join us at our tent to learn more about Chilliwack and check out our selection of local history books, including the recently re-published Chilliwack Story.

 
We’re also planning to bring the fun inside the museum with our updated Discovery Bins. Each bin contains hands-on objects and activities on specific topics to explore. We’ll be highlighting the bins with activities each week of the summer – find out what’s happening here!

 
As we get closer to the final few months of our exhibit Game On! The Evolution of Sports in Chilliwack, we’ll be inviting families to join us on July 30th for a Family Fun Day at the museum including tours, sports activities, games, prizes and more! We hope to see you there!