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Official Blog of the Chilliwack Museum and Archives

Posts Tagged ‘Chilliwack’

Heather Ramsay on our upcoming Writing Workshop

Posted on: March 7th, 2018 by

Guest Blog by Heather Ramsay

I’ve always been intrigued by the number of different stories that evolve out of one place.

Heather on Elk Mountain overlooking Ryder Lake.

Heather on Elk Mountain overlooking Ryder Lake.

The paths we follow in our daily routines, the people we encounter, our histories, our connections all influence what we observe. These details add layers to our stories and the stories of the places where we live.

I’m a relative newcomer to this area. Before coming here, I lived in Smithers and Haida Gwaii, both places with a lot of stories. I wrote many stories about these communities while working for the local newspapers. Since moving to the Fraser Valley, I’ve completed a Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing and have deepened the way I think about stories.

When I think about Chilliwack, my mind goes to mountains, rivers and fields, but also to the minute details of the aging a-frame house where I live in Ryder Lake. The creaking noise in the hallway and the warp in the windows that distort the view. The elongated hoof prints in my garden. The soggy patch where the rain drips off the roof into the yard. Through these details a narrative can grow.

The idea for this workshop is to let your concrete observations conjure a story about place. I was inspired by Douglas Glover in creating this workshop. The author of several books, including the Governor General award-winning novel, Elle, Glover is also a gifted creative writing teacher. In his on-line magazine Numero Cinq, he created a community where writers could learn and discuss stories and techniques — where they could meander and be among people who shared his passion for words. He encouraged this community to think more deeply about many things, including place.

His series, What It’s like Living Here, inspired writers from Edmonton, Minneapolis, Saskatoon, Nantucket, South Korea and more.

“Stick to concrete evocation of a series of places. Pack in as many concrete evocative details as you can. Don’t be seduced into talking too much about motives, relationships, the past, etc. Let the self arrive through the details of place. That said, sometimes a lovely narrative arises through the details of place. Let it,” he wrote in his instructions to those who wanted to submit.

Although Glover shut down his site to new submissions in Fall 2017, all the words and lessons he curated remain. And his teaching continues in workshops like this. I invite you to join me in an exploration of this place. “My Chilliwack: What It’s Like Living Here” will be held on March 17 from 10 to 4 at the Chilliwack Museum. Come and write about your house, your neighbourhood, a favourite street. Bring photos to inspire you or write about the things you see in the Chilliwack Museum. Take us on a tour of this place through your eyes. Maybe your story will be in the Chilliwack Museum blog next time.


Register for “My Chilliwack: What It’s Like Living Here” online here.

Connecting with the Collection: the Bobby Hales trumpet

Posted on: August 30th, 2017 by

Every object housed in the collection of the Chilliwack Museum and Archives has a story. As only a small percentage of these objects can be displayed in exhibitions, the remainder of the 10,000+ artifacts quietly wait for their time to be shown. To keep you connected with the different treasures within the collection, today I would like to feature the story of an old, bent trumpet with a larger-than-life history.

Used trumpet on white background; trumpet horn is bent upwards at a 30 degree angle.

The trumpet with its distinctive bent horn (Chilliwack Museum and Archives, 1987.053.001)

In August 1950, local resident Bobby (Robert Arthur) Hales (b. Avonlea, SK, 1934-d. Port Coquitlam, BC, 2016) wandered into Brett Sales Ltd. on 121 Yale Road West. Among the various goods and equipment, one object captivated the musically-oriented teenager: a recording trumpet made by F.E. Olds & Son.

Since his early years, Hales showed an interest in music, and was introduced to the cornet at the age of 9. In high school, he joined the Chilliwack Senior Band, directed at the time by Dick Galloway. Eventually a former teacher and clarinet player, John Bayfield, further recognized Hales’ talent and encouraged him to form a dance band which played concerts at the school cafeteria. This glimpse into the world of performance drew Hales to form a band called The White Spots, who played several concerts, including the Igloo Supper Club in Hope. Hales soon branched into any form of musical outlet that he could find, from church concerts, to the razz band that played basketball games.

black and white image; 4 seated musicians on a small stage play (from left to right) guitar, horn, drums and piano.

The Bright Spot Band playing the Riverside Pavilion in December 1953. Pictured are: Nick Oschefski (guitar). Bobby Hales (trumpet), Pat Boyces (drums), and Jim MacDonald (piano)

After high school, Hales worked at the bank of Nova Scotia, all the while harbouring the dream of making it as a professional musician. On a holiday to Los Angeles, Hales brought his trumpet to the Olds factory to have it plated. While there, he met fellow musician Rafael Méndez who encouraged him to apply to the Westlake College of Modern Music (a distinguished U.S. school for jazz). When his application was accepted, Hales left to study for 2 years in California, focusing on ear training, conducting, and jazz composition. After graduating in 1957, Hales moved to Vancouver and spent several years gaining entry into the field by working in pit bands and playing nightclubs. His perseverance paid off when he became involved as a composer and arranger for CBC’s Jazz Canadiana radio show, which featured his arrangements nationally. In 1965, he formed a group of 19 fellow musicians, known as the Bobby Hales Big Band, which backed acts such as Sonny and Cher, Bob Hope, Sammy Davis, Jr., and Frank Sinatra.  He also composed and conducted the theme and background music for the popular television series The Beachcombers. In 1977 Hales and his big band completed the first western Canada tour for a jazz band, ever.

Man plays trumpet with a group of musicians at a formal concert

Bobby Hales playing trumpet with his big band

Bobby Hales’ contributions to Canadian music continued from the 60’s, through the 70’s and 80’s, and he was inducted into the BC Entertainment Hall of Fame in 1996.

The trumpet continued to be used by Hales until 1978, when it finally wore out. He bent the bell of the trumpet upwards at a 30 degree angle, which was a method first used by Dizzie Gillespie. The trumpet now rests in the Chilliwack Museum and Archives’ collection, in a case decorated with a “Sinatra On Tour 1976” sticker.

Exploring Chinese-Canadian history in the Fraser Valley

Posted on: July 12th, 2017 by

The Chilliwack Museum and Archives’ latest exhibition 金山梦! 勇闯菲沙河谷 (Gold Mountain Dream: Bravely Venture into the Fraser Valley) is now open! From rare archival images and artifacts, to detailed storytelling and interactive elements, this exhibition focuses on early Chinese-Canadian history in the Fraser Valley.

Installation view of exhibition.

Installation view of the exhibition.

The Background Story

In the 1800s, gold fever consumed the world. Masses of people from all corners of the world voluntarily migrated to far-off locations such as Australia, New Zealand, California and British Columbia. Their goal was to find not only gold, but a better life for themselves and their families. By 1858 the territory now known as BC saw its first major gold rush along the Fraser Valley.

In Chinese culture, there was a myth about 山金 (Gold Mountain) that helped fuel an influx of migrants who journeyed from ports in Hong Kong across the Pacific Ocean to Victoria in search for new fortune. This resulted in the first large Chinese settlement in Canada.

After the gold rush lost its momentum, many workers of Chinese origin chose Chilliwack as a place to settle down and try to build a new life. It wasn’t easy. Much of Chilliwack’s early infrastructure, from roads to farmlands, was developed by Chinese laborers. It was strenuous work, clearing the land of trees and cultivating soil at low pay, and many workers couldn’t afford to have their families join them in Canada.

Business owners Wong Gip She (right) and Wong Gip Low She (left) with their two sons Banford and David, c. 1916. CMA P7642

Chinatown South business owners Wong Gip She (right) and Wong Gip Low She (left) with their two sons Banford and David, c. 1916. CMA P7642

Many persevered, however, and by the 1880’s a Chinese merchant class emerged (and between 1908 and 1930 comprised 10% of the registered businesses in Chilliwack). By 1920 the city had two distinct Chinatowns: Chinatown North situated above the Five Corners region; and Chinatown South, around what is now Yale Road West. At their height, the Chinatown’s were host to a bustling population living in large 2-storey wood-frame buildings, including a Chinese Masonic Hall.

An International Exhibition

Key historical content for the exhibition’s local elements was based on the 2011 book Chilliwack’s Chinatowns: A History by Chad Reimer. The Gold Mountain Dream panels are a travelling exhibition organized by the Royal British Columbia Museum, Victoria, in collaboration with the Canadian Museum of History in Gatineau, Quebec. These panels are bilingual, and are written both in English and Simplified Chinese. Beyond Chilliwack, Gold Mountain Dream has been displayed at the Guangdong Museum of Chinese Nationals Residing Abroad (Guangzhou, China) and the Chinese Cultural Centre Museum (Vancouver, BC).

Detail view of artifacts in a display case.

Detail view of artifacts in a display case.

Interactive Elements

The exhibition has interactive content for viewers of all ages, from touchable objects, to videos, an audiostation, and an introductory Mahjong set. So bring the whole family for a visit, or plan a Thursday evening date night to catch this stunning exhibition!

The exhibition will continue running throughout the summer until October 9th.